The War Profiteers - War Crimes, Kidnappings, Torture and Big Money

 

 

The Arms Trafficking

 

Background

Media Reports

Government Reports

Photo Credits

 

Background

 

 

 

 

Media Reports

 

July 28th, 2007 - U.S. Set to Offer Huge Arms Deal to Saudi Arabia

1 news article by the New York Times

 

October 29th, 2006 - Russia Led Arms Sales to Developing World in ’05

1 news article by the New York Times

 

 

 

Government Reports

 

October 23rd, 2006 - Conventional Arms Transfers to Developing Nations, 1998 - 2005

CRS Report for U.S. Congress

 

“[…] This report is prepared annually to provide Congress with official, unclassified, quantitative data on conventional arms transfers to developing nations by the United States and foreign countries for the preceding eight calendar years for use in its various policy oversight functions. All agreement and delivery data in this report for the United States are government-to-government (FMS) transactions. Some general data are provided on worldwide conventional arms transfers by all suppliers, but the principal focus is the level of arms transfers by major weapons suppliers to nations in the developing world.

 

“Developing nations continue to be the primary focus of foreign arms sales activity by weapons suppliers. During the years 1998-2005, the value of arms transfer agreements with developing nations comprised 66.8% of all such agreements worldwide. More recently, arms transfer agreements with developing nations constituted 64.3% of all such agreements globally from 2002-2005, and 68.4% of these agreements in 2005.

 

“The value of all arms transfer agreements with developing nations in 2005 was nearly $30.2 billion. This was a notable increase over 2004, and the highest total, in real terms, for the entire period from 1998-2005. In 2005, the value of all arms deliveries to developing nations was $17.7 billion, the lowest total in these deliveries values for the entire 1998-2005 period (in constant 2005 dollars).

 

“Recently, from 2002-2005, the United States and Russia have dominated the arms market in the developing world, with the United States ranking first for 3 out of 4 years in the value of arms transfer agreements, with Russia ranking second for 3 out of these same four years. From 2002-2005, the United States made $33.3 billion in arms transfer agreements with developing nations, in constant 2005 dollars, 35.2% of all such agreements. Russia, the second leading supplier during this period, made $21.8 billion in arms transfer agreements, or 24.3%. Collectively, the United States and Russia made nearly 60% of all arms transfer agreements with developing nations during this four year period. […]

 

“United States. - The total value - in real terms - of United States arms transfer agreements with developing nations fell significantly from $9.4 billion in 2004 to about $6.2 billion in 2005. The U.S. share of the value of all such agreements was 20.5% in 2005, down from a 35.4% share in 2004 […].

 

“In 2005, the value of U.S. arms transfer agreements with developing nations was attributable to a substantial number of smaller valued purchases by a wide variety of U.S. clients in the Near East and in Asia, rather than by the conclusion of a few very expensive contracts with a small number of traditional clients. These arms agreement totals illustrate the continuing U.S. advantage of having well established defense support arrangements with weapons purchasers worldwide, based upon the existing variety of U.S. weapons systems their militaries utilize. U.S. agreements with all of its clients in 2005 include not only sales of major weapons systems, but also the upgrading of systems previously provided. The U.S. totals also include agreements for a wide variety of spare parts, ammunition, ordnance, training, and support services which, in the aggregate, have very significant value.

 

“Among the larger valued arms transfer agreements the United States concluded in 2005 with developing nations were: with the United Arab Emirates for the upgrade of its AH-64A APACHE helicopters to the AH-64D model, together with associated weapons for over $740 million. Other U.S. arms agreements in 2005 were with Egypt for 25 AVENGER fire units for $110 million, and for 50 turbine engines to upgrade CH-47 CHINOOK helicopters for $73 million; with Kuwait for upgrade support of its FA-18 fighter aircraft for $195 million; with Saudi Arabia for $110 million in F-15 fighter engine overhauls; with Pakistan: for 60 AGM-84L HARPOON missiles for $160 million; for 6 PHALANX close-in-weapons systems for $79 million; for 2000 TOW-2A missiles for $65 million, and for a package of HF/VHF radio systems for $77 million. […]”

 

 

 

 

 

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